Since the Ice Age deer have always been the principal game quarry. Size made them the most obvious target. There were and are still large numbers living in the wild and they provided both meat and a valuable hide. 

By the thirteenth century, Royal hunting preserves covered a staggering amount of the country. Deer was mostly reserved for noblemen, treated as the spoils of sport. It is this history that often gives venison its slightly stuffy reputation and quite frankly uninspiring recipes; stews and roasts are what you will find most often when searching for inspiration, a shame as venison is such an incredibly versatile meat. 

Venison is very lean and so lends itself to simple, fresh dishes. It's meaty, mineral richness begs for flavours to cut through and enhance.

We've created this super simple dish of tartare to capture and celebrate the wonderful carnivorous complexity of venison. 

Ingredients

Method

Using a very sharp knife, gently dice the venison into tiny cubes, as quickly as possible to ensure everything is kept cold, and then return the diced meat to the fridge.

For the dressing, char the peppers over an open flame until completely blackened then place into a bowl and cover with cling film. Allow to sweat for 5 minutes then peel the skin away.

Dice the pepper flesh along with the chili, shallot and parsley. Mix together with the Worchester sauce and a dash of olive oil.

Remove the diced venison from the fridge and add the egg yolk, along with enough dressing to bind it together without being too wet and sloppy. Season well with salt and pepper. Leave to marinate for 15 minutes.

Thinly slice the sourdough and then lightly oil each piece. Place into and oven at 180C for 10 minutes or until golden brown.

Serve the venison tartare on the sourdough with a little extra olive oil drizzled over the top. 

Venison recipe