Bambi or Beast, a Lovely Feast

Bambi or Beast, a Lovely Feast


By Abby Allen
07, January 2018

We grow our amazing Great Taste Gold winning venison in one of the most beautiful locations in Devon, in the grounds of Bridwell Park about 4 miles from Pipers Farm.

The drive up to the house is simply spectacular. Far in the distance, you can see the strong turrets shape of the classic Georgian pile peeping out through the tall trees who have stood there for many a year. In the fields below the trees there you’ll see a narrow river running down off the Exe estuary. Between the old oak and cedar trees and the little meandering river lies a vast field alive with Parkland Fallow Deer. Simply breathtaking. They live like lords & ladies in the grounds of the old house. Not a drop out of place beneath the historic building and ancient woodland. They are incredibly graceful.

For this grace and beauty is often their downfall when it comes to eating these incredible beasts. Unfortunately, many people feel they are simply ‘too sweet’, ‘too cute’ or ‘too pretty’ to eat. The dreaded name ‘Bambi’ is all too often mentioned. Our hearts full remembering sweet little Bambi trying to take his first wobbly steps into the big wide world after suffering through a horrible start to life. We were all rooting for him. It’s this emotional attachment that often leads to Venison being forgotten as a source of delicious, lean protein as part of our diet - something of a crime, I feel.

Thankfully, venison is slowly shrugging off its cutesy ‘Bambi’ image, and the notion that it’s only enjoyed by the wealthy with an expensive bottle of red. In truth, venison is an incredibly versatile meal. Its fine texture makes it the perfect ingredient for slow stews, comforting casseroles, succulent steaks, lean burgers and really special roasts.

Cooking venison is a game of two halves. For the chops, fillet and saddle you must cook fast and leave to rest. For the shoulder and breast meat, you need a little patience, as this must be cooked low and slow to get the best results. If you want to eat venison as a joint or a steak, it is best cooked rare to make the most of its fine grained texture and succulent, light, gamey taste.

In any shape or form, venison is a wonderful treat to enjoy at this time of year, one that shouldn’t be missed. Bambi or beast, venison is in my mind the king of the autumnal feast.

You May Also Like

Festive stuffed pork belly

Festive stuffed pork belly

This year’s Christmas menu doesn’t have to be the same as last year. While some of you may be agh... Read More
Pork liver and damson paté

Pork liver and damson paté

I don't know about you but in our household, at Christmas time, every drink that is poured needs ... Read More
Christmas spiced chicken wings

Christmas spiced chicken wings

The tree is up. The holly is hanging from its hook on the front door. The house smells deliciousl... Read More
Gill Meller's prune, bacon and sage stuffing

Gill Meller's prune, bacon and sage stuffing

When it comes to festive feasting, we go all out on the indulgence scale, making our Christmas me... Read More